Patient Center

Loretta admissions

We work hard to make your experience with East Georgia Radiology as quick and pleasant as possible.  Before coming in for your appointment, please review the guidelines and preparations to help ensure optimal speed.  Our staff makes every effort to pre-register patients for any outpatient procedures to expedite your wait time.  We apologize for the extensive paperwork but due to the heavily regulated environment of medicine, this is beyond our control. Please call your scheduled location for more information on patient preps.

Please scroll down the page to view the patient prep, or select a prep from the menu to the left to jump to that prep.

Patient Preps


Angioplasty & Vascular Stenting

You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”).

Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure. Also inform your doctor about recent illnesses or other medical conditions.

Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation. If an x-ray is necessary, precautions will be taken to minimize radiation exposure to the baby.


Arterial Catheterizations (Angiograms)

Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation. If an x-ray is necessary, precautions will be taken to minimize radiation exposure to the baby.  If you are breastfeeding at the time of the exam, you should ask your doctor how to proceed. It may help to pump breast milk ahead of time and keep it on hand for use after contrast material has cleared from your body, about 24 hours after the test.

If you are going to be given a sedative during the procedure, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything for four to eight hours before your exam. Be sure that you have clear instructions from your health care facility.

If you are sedated, you should not drive for 24 hours after your exam and you should arrange for someone to drive you home. Because an observation period is necessary following the exam, you may be admitted to the hospital for an overnight stay if you live more than an hour away.


Breast Aspiration

For your convenience, please wear a two-piece outfit. Do not use deodorant, powder, or perfume under the arm or breast area.


Breast MRI

If you need sedation for claustrophobia, you must have someone else drive you to and from your exam.

• Do not wear jewelry

• Do not wear anything with metal (zippers, snaps, hooks.) Athletic wear with elastic waistband is a good choice.


Breast Ultrasound

For your convenience, please wear a two-piece outfit. Do not use deodorant, powder, or perfume under the arm or breast area.


Catheter Embolization

Prior to your procedure, your blood may be tested to determine how well your kidneys are functioning and whether your blood clots normally.

You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”). Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure.

You will receive specific instructions on how to prepare, including any changes that need to be made to your regular medication schedule.

You will likely be instructed not to eat or drink anything after midnight before your procedure. Your doctor will tell you which medications you may take in the morning. You will be admitted to the hospital on the morning of your procedure and be assessed by the interventional radiologist before the procedure begins. You should plan to stay overnight at the hospital for one or more days. You will be given a gown to wear during the procedure.


CT (CAT Scan)

CT’s of the abdomen and pelvis usually require a 24 hour prep. You may be asked not to eat or drink anything for one or more hours before your exam. The prep supplies for CT abdomen and pelvis exams are available for you to pick up at the location where your exam is scheduled.  Please call the location you are scheduled at for more details.


CT Angiography (CTA)

You will be asked not to eat or drink anything for one or more hours before your exam.  If you have any questions about your exam, please call the location you are scheduled at for more details.


CT Enterography (CTE)

You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to your exam. You may be given a gown to wear during the procedure.  Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and should be left at home or removed prior to your exam. You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras containing metal underwire. You may be asked to remove any piercings, if possible.

You should inform the technologist if you have a pacemaker. Pacemakers do not hinder the use of CT as in MRI as long as the scanner will not be taking images repeatedly over the area of the pacemaker device in the upper chest. This is usually not an issue for cardiac CT exams.

You will be asked not to eat or drink anything for four hours prior to the procedure.

You should inform your physician of any medications you are taking and if you have any allergies. If you have a known allergy to contrast material, or “dye,” your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction, or order a different test.

Also inform your doctor of any recent illnesses or other medical conditions, and if you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect.


DEXA (Bone Densitometry)

• No calcium supplements or osteoporosis medication 24 hours prior to your exam.
• No barium, nuclear medicine or I.V. contrast exams within 7 days prior your exam.
• Please wear comfortable clothes and avoid metal buttons or buckles.


Digital Mammography

For your convenience, please wear a two-piece outfit. Do not use deodorant, powder, or perfume under the arm or breast area.


Fluoroscopy

BARIUM ENEMA

 24-hour prep done the day before exam. 

Breakfast-Liquid diet; no sugar; no dairy

Lunch- Light lunch. Clear soup, unsweetened fruit juices, sugar-free gelatin, black coffee or plain tea. No milk or cream.

Dinner- Liquid dinner. Clear soup, unsweetened fruit juices, sugar-free gelatin, black coffee or plain tea. No milk or cream.

Drink plenty of water throughout the day (minimum of 60 oz)

Bedtime- Take 3 Bisacodyl tablets with water. Do not chew.

Morning of Exam

• Do not eat or drink. You may take any prescribed medications, except for those that must be taken with food.

• Administer Bisacodyl suppository.

• Diabetic patients may have a liquid breakfast (12 ounces of sweetened fruit juice) and take their medication.

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Gastrointestinal Series (UGI and/or Small Bowel)

•  Nothing by mouth after midnight (this includes water). No water should be drank after midnight.

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Intravenous Pyelogram or Nephrotomography

• Clear liquid diet (no milk products) starting at noon on the day before the exam. Sugar substitutes are permitted.

• Three Bisacodyl (do not chew) with two, 8-ounce glasses of water at 4:00 PM.

• Do not take anything by mouth 3 hours prior to the exam. You may take any prescribed medications except for those that must be taken with food.


Kyphoplasty

A clinical evaluation will be performed to confirm the presence of a compression fracture that may benefit from treatment with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. The evaluation may include diagnostic imaging, blood tests, a physical exam, spine x-rays and a radioisotope bone scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

You may be given bone-strengthening medication during treatment. You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”). Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure. You will need to have blood drawn for tests prior to the procedure to determine if your blood clots normally.

On the day of the procedure, you should be able to take your usual medications with sips of water or clear liquid up to six hours before the procedure. You should avoid drinking orange juice, cream and milk.

In most cases, you should take your usual medications, especially blood pressure medications. These may be taken with sips of water on the morning of your procedure. Other than medications, you may be instructed to not eat or drink anything for several hours before your procedure. You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure.


MRA (Magnetic Resonance Angiography)

If you need sedation for claustrophobia, you must have someone else drive you to and from your exam.  Please call your scheduled location for any additional questions.

• Do not wear jewelry

• Do not wear anything with metal (zippers, snaps, hooks.) Athletic wear with elastic waistband is a good choice.

• Patients having an MRI of the head or neck should not wear makeup


MRI

If you need sedation for claustrophobia, you must have someone else drive you to and from your exam.  Please call your scheduled location for any additional questions.

• Do not wear jewelry

• Do not wear anything with metal (zippers, snaps, hooks.) Athletic wear with elastic waistband is a good choice.

• Patients having an MRI of the head or neck should not wear makeup


MRI Guided Biopsy

Wear a gown during the exam or you may be allowed to wear your own clothing if it is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and also with the facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual.

Some MRI examinations may require the patient to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist or technologist may ask if you have allergies of any kind, such as allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, the environment, or asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam is called gadolinium. Because gadolinium does not contain iodine, it can be used safely in patients with contrast allergies.

The radiologist should also know if you have any serious health problems, or if you have recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease may prevent you from being given contrast material for an MRI. If there is a history of kidney disease, it may be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately.


Nuclear Medicine Bone Scan

You may be asked to wear a gown during the exam or you may be allowed to wear your own clothing.

Jewelry and other metallic accessories should be left at home if possible, or removed prior to the exam because they may interfere with the procedure. You will receive specific instructions based on the type of scan you are undergoing.


Nuclear Medicine Gallium Scan

There is no preparation before the first day of your exam, however, during your first visit you will receive a laxative to use at home that afternoon before your scan on day 2.


Nuclear Medicine Parathyroid Scan

You may be asked to wear a gown during the exam or you may be allowed to wear your own clothing.

Jewelry and other metallic accessories should be left at home if possible, or removed prior to the exam because they may interfere with the procedure. You will receive specific instructions based on the type of scan you are undergoing.


Nuclear Medicine Thyroid Scan

If you are on thyroid medications or preparations that contain iodine, you will be asked to stop taking these medications. Depending on the type of medication you are taking, we will make sure you have discontinued taking it for the appropriate amount of time before the thyroid scan. This can be up to 6 weeks prior to the scan.


Open MRI

If you need sedation for claustrophobia, you must have someone else drive you to and from your exam.  Please call your scheduled location for any additional questions.

• Do not wear jewelry

• Do not wear anything with metal (zippers, snaps, hooks.) Athletic wear with elastic waistband is a good choice.

• Patients having an MRI of the head or neck should not wear makeup


PET/CT

• Must be able to lie still for up to 90 minutes.

• Do not wear anything with metal (zippers, snaps, hooks). Athletic wear with elastic waistband is a good choice.

• Take necessary pain medications before leaving home and bring additional pain medication with you at time of visit.

• Claustrophobic patients should take Valium prior to leaving home and arrive with a driver.

• May take any other prescribed medications, as long as they can be tolerated on an empty stomach.

• No food for 6 hours prior to study. May drink water, but no other type of liquid is allowed.

• Glucose levels will be checked prior to exam.

• Insulin dependent patients may bring insulin with them to be administered after their scan.

• No physical activity for 48 hours prior to exam.


Stereotactic Breast Biopsy

There are several things you can do to make your procedure easier, more efficient and more comfortable.

• Discuss any medication you are taking with your clinician. You may be asked to stop the use of blood-thinning medications, including aspirin, a number of days prior to your biopsy procedure.

• Wear a two-piece outfit that is comfortable and easy to remove.

• Do not use deodorant, powder, or perfume under the arm or breast area. They may interfere with the quality of the images taken during your procedure.

• Eat a light meal before your procedure.


Ultrasound

You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to remove all clothing and jewelry in the area to be examined. You may be asked to wear a gown during the procedure.

Other preparation depends on the type of examination you will have. For some scans your doctor may instruct you not to eat or drink for as many as 12 hours before your appointment. For others you may be asked to drink up to six glasses of water two hours prior to your exam and avoid urinating so that your bladder is full when the scan begins.


Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to remove all clothing and jewelry in the area to be examined. You may be asked to wear a gown during the procedure.

Prior to a needle biopsy, you should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to anesthesia. Your physician will advise you to stop taking aspirin or a blood thinner three days before your procedure.  Also, inform your doctor about recent illnesses or other medical conditions. You may want to have a relative or friend accompany you and drive you home afterward. This is recommended if you have been sedated.


Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE)

Imaging of the uterus by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound is performed prior to the procedure to determine if fibroid tumors are the cause of your symptoms and to fully assess the size, number and location of the fibroids. Occasionally, your gynecologist may want to take a direct look at the uterus by performing a laparoscopy. If you are bleeding heavily in between periods, a biopsy of the endometrium (the inner lining of the uterus) may be performed to rule out cancer.

You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”). Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure.

You will likely be instructed not to eat or drink anything after midnight before your procedure. Your doctor will tell you which medications you may take in the morning. You should plan to stay overnight at the hospital following your procedure.


Vascular Access Procedures

Prior to your procedure, your blood may be tested to determine how well your kidneys are functioning and whether your blood clots normally.

You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”). Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure.

You will receive specific instructions on how to prepare, including any changes that need to be made to your regular medication schedule. Other than medications, you may be instructed to not eat or drink anything for several hours before your procedure. You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure.

Venograms

Other than medications, you may be instructed to not eat or drink anything for several hours before your procedure. You may be allowed to drink clear liquids on the day of your procedure. You should inform your physician of any medications you are taking and if you have any allergies, especially to barium or iodinated contrast materials. Also inform your doctor about recent illnesses or other medical conditions.


Vertebroplasty

A clinical evaluation will be performed to confirm the presence of a compression fracture that may benefit from treatment with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. The evaluation may include diagnostic imaging, blood tests, a physical exam, spine x-rays and a radioisotope bone scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

You may be given bone-strengthening medication during treatment. You should report to your doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as “dye” or “x-ray dye”). Your physician may advise you to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or blood thinners for a specified period of time before your procedure. You will need to have blood drawn for tests prior to the procedure to determine if your blood clots normally.

On the day of the procedure, you should be able to take your usual medications with sips of water or clear liquid up to six hours before the procedure. You should avoid drinking orange juice, cream and milk.

In most cases, you should take your usual medications, especially blood pressure medications. These may be taken with sips of water on the morning of your procedure. Other than medications, you may be instructed to not eat or drink anything for several hours before your procedure. You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure.


X-Ray

Most x-rays require no special preparation. You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothes and to wear a gown during the exam. You may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images.